Julie Murray, Friday, September 25, 7pm – FREE!

Orchard Butterfly b&w

This hour-long program contains films that combine found and original footage to conjure strange and paradoxical universes resonant with ambiguous and lyrical meanings. Engaged as often with landscape as with the artifacts and aberrations found in contemporary image-making technologies, Julie Murray’s films synthesize personal worlds through sound and image, hypnotic in their deftly constructed atmospheres.

Her work was featured in the 2004 edition of the Whitney Biennial and her films are part of the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art. Murray has presented her work at venues including REDCAT (Los Angeles), Anthology Film Archives, Media City Film Festival, Pacific Film Archives, Los Angeles Filmforum, the San Francisco Cinematheque and Cinematheque Ontario (Toronto). Murray’s early super-8 films were selected for a National Film Preservation Foundation Award in 2014.

The screening will be held in E105, the Franklin Miller Screening Room, in the Adler Journalism Building on the University of Iowa campus.

 

Bio

Drawing on her background in the Fine Arts, filmmaker Julie Murray makes short experimental works in digital and film media which are poetical in nature, engaging the textural imprints and limits of the form as an essential element of pictorial content.

She has made more than twenty-five film and digital works which have been exhibited at numerous national and international venues including the New York Film Festival, the Hong Kong International Film Festival, the International Film Festival Rotterdam, the London Film Festival and the Flaherty Film Seminar.

 

Program:

End Reel, 2014, 7min

END REEL convolves certain aberrations in two image-making technologies; film and video, to produce a complex and largely abstract image without detaching entirely from the narrative contained in the reel.

 

Untitled (earth): A sketch, 2015, 1min

A numerically ordered imposition upon a landscape vast in scope, fathom and spectacle.

 

I Began to Wish….., 2003, 5min

The sea sucks the seed back into the ocean, the flowers fold like umbrellas, shoots recoil into hiding, in seeds that shrink.

 

If You Stand With Your Back to the Slowing of the Speed of Light in Water, 1997, 17min

Images from an aerial tram leaving Manhattan are followed by images of a nearly static bird, of bugs fighting, and of light bending as it passes through glass.

 

Orchard, 2004, 10min

Among the trees and a 19th century ruin of a walled orchard in southwest Ireland, images wind into an arrangement of continuous wandering.

 

Micromoth, 2000, 7min

Infinitely divisible focal planes define the topography and tilt of an insect limb, large and tortuous as a conifer, or a thorax, brown as maple syrup, all repeatedly emerging and dissolving through the bending of light as if composed of vapor.

 

Untitled (light), 2002, 5min

The film’s haunting images are accompanied by the continuous sound of a helicopter circling overhead, which at the close gives way to the distant sound of police sirens.

 

Distance, 2010, 12min

Notions of home and its ache are, to borrow a phrase, “not capable of being told unless by far-off hints and adumbrations” 1.

1Lowell, James Russell  Among my books 1870; series II, 1876

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Fall 2015 Program!

Mark your calendars / Headroom is back!

We are proud to announce our Fall schedule of experimental film programs and performances! Stay tuned for more information about each!

Friday, Sept 25, 7pm, Julie Murray
at The Franklin Miller Screening Room, 105 Adler Journalism Building

Still from Julie Murray's End Reel

Julie Murray – End Reel

Visiting faculty member in the Department of Cinematic Arts, filmmaker Julie Murray will present a collection of 16mm and digital films that combine found and original footage to conjure strange and paradoxical universes resonant with ambiguous meanings.

Saturday, Oct 03, 7pm, NSEW: Films by Vanessa Renwick
at FilmScene

Image from Vanessa Renwick's Layover

Vanessa Renwick – Layover

Portland-based DIY filmmaker Vanessa Renwick, founder of the Oregon Department of Kick Ass, will visit Iowa City to screen a collection from her wildly eclectic filmography that covers a spectrum of tones, styles, and subjects that are hard to forget.

Sunday, Nov 15, 7pm, Michael A. Morris
at PS1

Still from Michael A. Morris' Second Hermeneutic

Michael A. Morris – Second Hermeneutic

Dallas-based filmmaker Mike Morris will be in town to present a light and sound spectacle of epic proportions! Creating a loop of 16mm projections and an HD video camera, Morris produces a real-time, synaesthetic cinematic experience using the artifacts of one medium interpreting another as raw material.

 

Headroom news

Hello!

With mixed feelings I am announcing my departure from the University of Iowa and the Department of Cinematic Arts. I will be moving to Milwaukee to join the Dept. of Film, Video, Animation and New Genres.

However, Headroom Screening Series will continue under the curation of Mike Gibisser and Jason Livingston, and continue our partnerships with Public Space One, Film Scene, Department of Cinematic Arts and the Studio.

Stay tuned for fall programming!

Thank you to the Iowa City community for your support these last 2.5 years and all the artists and filmmakers who we’ve been honored to present!

All the best,

Jesse

Kelly Sears at FilmScene, Thursday, March 12 at 7pm – FREE!

The_Body_Besieged

This hour-long program contains films that address failure – of technology, of progress, and history.  But this failure creates an opportunity to ­­reexamine and envision other speculative narratives. A former President is possessed by his nightmares, high school students are infected by a sinister force in their school’s architecture, astronauts drift away from their missions and telephone operators are built into a covert observation network.

Her work has screened at museums, galleries and film festivals, such as MOMA, The Hammer Museum, LACMA, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Machine Project, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Light Industry, Sundance Film Festival, SXSW Film Festival, Ann Arbor Film Festival and Black Maria Film Festival. She teaches animation and film production at the University of Colorado, Boulder.

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Bio:

Kelly Sears is an experimental animator that cuts up and collages imagery from American culture and politics to intervene with the history embedded in the frame.  Working with appropriated images ranging from thrift store cast-offs to archival material, she uses animation to rebuild American histories that shift between the official and the uncanny while exploring contemporary narratives of power, such as manifest destiny, occupation and surveillance.

Program:

PATTERN FOR SURVIVAL, 2015, 6:00

As you read the rest of this manual, keep in mind the need for a survival pattern.

THE DRIFT, 2007, 8:20

A mysterious disappearance on a late 1960s space journey entrances the nation. This film reexamines the nature of our country’s expansionist endeavors and the desire to push too far, too fast.

COVER ME ALPHA, 2011, 2:30

Names of maneuvers and procedures from a military yearbook re-caption the activities of soldiers in battle.

THE BODY BESIEGED, 2009, 4:00

An exploration of the darker side of getting in shape. Animated instructional photographs from yoga and workout books reveal bewitched and frenzied bodies and maneuvers.

VOICE ON THE LINE, 2009, 6:45

Figures from archival films from the 1950s are recast in a large-scale secret operation that veers bizarrely off course. The film reflects on current relationships among national security, civil liberties and telephone companies.

IMPRINTED, 2011, 2:00

Clear tape, newspaper ink and sheets of acetate. Traces from the week of the failed rapture, destructive tornadoes and other discord in 2011.

ONCE IT STARTED IT COULD NOT END OTHERWISE, 2011, 7:30

Candid photos from 1970s high school yearbooks resurface in a minimalist horror story. An unknown force seeps into the walls of the school that eerily mirrors larger political and social markers of the recent past.

HE HATES TO BE SECOND, 2008, 3:00

Excavated text fragments from a 1963 article about Robert Kennedy from a magazine are collaged with visual fragments from other popular 1963 publications.

THE RANCHER, 2012, 7:00

A parafictional newsreel chronicling a series of terrible dreams unhinges a man in power.

TROPICAL DEPRESSION, 2012, 2:45

Images from recent hurricanes and the 1931 Miss Universe Contest are collaged into an animated séance that channels Galveston’s haunted history.

JUPITER ELICIUS, 2010, 5:05

A storm transcends a meteorologist’s predictions. Commissioned for the Orbit(film) project.

The_Rancher

 

 

Farocki in February – Feb. 13 + 14

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Headroom Screening Series proudly presents a two-day program to honor the late Harun Farocki. Farocki, a German filmmaker with over 90 films that pushed the boundaries of experimental documentary, remains an inspiration to innumerable artists, filmmakers, students and scholars.

We are enormously proud to present these works and offer an opportunity to create a forum for conversation. Thanks to the University of Iowa Libraries, Department of Cinematic Arts and the Digital Studio for Public Arts and Humanities for your support.

In honor of filmmaker Harun Farocki (1944 – 2014).

All screenings free and open to the public.

Location: 105 Adler Journalism Building, University of Iowa

Friday, February 13
7pm

Sauerbruch Hutton Architects, 73’, 2013

“Three months in an architects’ firm in Berlin. From the architecture down to the tiniest door handle, a questioning of matter and the verb.” — Harun Farocki

Inextinguishable Fire, 1969, 22’

Resolutely, Farocki names names: the manufacturer is Dow Chemical, based in Midland, Michigan in the United States. Against backdrops suggesting the laboratories and offices of this corporation, the film proceeds to educate us with an austerity reminiscent of Jean Marie Straub.

His point of departure is the following: “When napalm is burning, it is too late to extinguish it. You have to fight napalm where it is produced: in the factories.” — Video Data Bank

Saturday, February 14 – Two screenings
2pm screening: An Image + Images of the World and Inscriptions of War

An Image, 1983, 25’

“Four days spent in a studio working on a centerfold photo for Playboy magazine provided the subject matter for my film. The magazine itself deals with culture, cars, a certain lifestyle. Maybe all those trappings are only there to cover up the naked woman. … This film, An Image, is part of a series I’ve been working on since 1979. The television station that commissioned it assumes in these cases that I’m making a film that is critical of its subject matter, and the owner or manager of the thing that’s being filmed assumes that my film is an advertisement for them. I try to do neither. Nor do I want to do something in between, but beyond both.” — Harun Farocki, Zelluloid, no. 27, Fall 1988

Images of the World and Inscriptions of War, 1988, 73’

“One must be just as wary of pictures as of words. There is no literature without linguistic criticism, without the author being critical of the existing language. It’s just the same with film. One need not look for new, as yet unseen images, but one must work with existing ones in such a way that they become new.” — Jörg Becker, TAZ, 1989

4pm screening: Eye/Machine I, II, III

Eye Machine I, II, III, 2001-2003, 65’

Harun Farocki utilizes a vast collection of image sequences from laboratories, archives and production facilities to explore modern weapons technology. This trilogy examines “intelligent” image processing techniques such as electronic surveillance, mapping and object recognition, in order to take a closer look at the relationship between man, machine, and modern warfare. — Video Data Bank

Programmed by Mike Gibisser, Jason Livingston and Jesse McLean.

The New England Home Movie Tour at Public Space One!

Sorry (2005-2012) a 35mm handmade slide from a series of 80, Luther Price

Sorry (2005-2012) a 35mm handmade slide from a series of 80, Luther Price

Headroom Screening Series is happy to start of the Spring 2015 programming with a visit by touring filmmakers/programmers Warren Cockerham and Colin Brant. Join us at Public Space One as these visiting filmmakers present a program of New England-based filmmakers.

Where: Public Space One – When: Wednesday, Feb. 4 – 8:00pm – Admission – $5

The New England Home Movie Tour features handmade and homemade poetic film works from the northeast that celebrate the tactility and intimacy of celluloid-based moving images. As the commercial film industry forces us to embrace digital moving images and the planned obsolescence of the means to produce and distribute those products, this film tour aims to share films that embrace the contemporary DIY strategies, politics, and aesthetics of an enduring, artisanal, and personal approach to filmmaking. This traveling program carries with it more than 30 16mm works and 120 35mm slides that will ensure a uniquely arranged program at each stop along its way. With works by Luther Price, Jodie Mack, Robert Todd, Jonathan Schwartz, Jo Dery, Warren Cockerham, and Colin Brant.

Persian Pickles (2012) 3min, color, sound, 16mm,   Jodie Mack

Persian Pickles (2012) 3min, color, sound, 16mm, Jodie Mack

Filmmaker Bios:

Luther Price (Revere, MA): Known since the 1980s for his Super-8 films and performances, Luther Price has, in recent years, turned to 16mm film, creating new works from discarded prints of old documentaries, snippets of Hollywood features, and other examples of cinematic detritus. He re-edits the footage by hand, effaces the image through scraping, buries the films to rot and gather mold, and adds chaotic visual patterns using colored inks and permanent markers. For soundtracks, he frequently uses only the brutal electro-mechanical noise generated by sprocket holes running through the projector’s audio system. Each reel he produces is thereby a unique object, often altered to such an extent that it struggles through the projector, as if playing out the end of film itself; his is a cinema that ecstatically embraces its death drive, so as to achieve maximum potency.

Using some of the same techniques as for his films, the artist also creates handmade slides, which were first exhibited at the 2012 Whitney Biennial. Price makes these slides to stand as general representations of his film pieces; when asked to contribute an image of his work for publication, he prefers to submit a slide, rather than reproduce one frame of a filmstrip, because each slide exists as a discrete, independent work. These isolated objects, however, demonstrate just as much strength as the films they are intended to epitomize.

Price typically begins with found footage, which he cuts up and reassembles, combines, and otherwise alters. He often presses other things between the two glass plates of the slides, projecting ants, dirt, and adhesive materials onto the gallery wall. Like his films, these slides are studies of a dying technology, pushing and exploring the qualities of light projected through and onto a variety of transparent, semitransparent, and opaque materials.

Jodie Mack (Lebanon, NH): Jodie Mack is an experimental animator who received her MFA in film, video, and new media from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2007 and currently teaches animation at Dartmouth College. Combining the formal techniques and structures of abstract/absolute animation with those of cinematic genres, her handmade films use collage to explore the relationship between graphic cinema and storytelling, the tension between form and meaning. Musical documentary or stroboscopic archive: her films study domestic and recycled materials to illuminate the elements shared between fine-art abstraction and mass-produced graphic design. Questioning the role of decoration in daily life, the works unleash the kinetic energy of overlooked and wasted objects.

Mack’s 16mm films have screened at a variety of venues including the Images Festival, Ann Arbor Film Festival, Rotterdam Film Festival, Edinburgh International Film Festival, and Views From the Avant Garde at the New York Film Festival. She has presented solo programs of her work at venues such as the Anthology Film Archives, Los Angeles Filmforum, REDCAT, and the BFI London Film Festival. She has also worked as a curator and administrator with Dartmouth’s EYEWASH: Experimental Films and Videos, Florida Experimental Film and Video Festival, Portland Documentary and Experimental Film Festival, Eye and Ear Clinic, Chicago Underground Film Festival, and The Nightingale. She was a featured artist at the 2011 Flaherty Seminar, and she’s the 2013 recipient of the Marion McMahan Award at the Images Festival.

Robert Todd (Boston, MA): A lyrical filmmaker as well as a sound and visual artist, Robert Todd continually produces short works that resist categorization. In the past twenty years he has produced a large body of short-to-medium format films that have been exhibited internationally at a wide variety of venues and festivals including the Media City Festival, San Francisco International Film Festival, Rotterdam International Film Festival, New York Film Festival, Le Rencontres Internationale, Black Maria Film Festival, Nouveau Cinema in Montreal, Cinematheque Ontario, the Harvard Film Archive, Pacific Film Archive, the Paris Biennial, Slamdance Film Festival, and others. His films have won numerous festival prizes, grants, and artist’s awards. He teaches film production at Emerson College in Boston.

Jonathan Schwartz (Brattleboro, VT): Jonathan Schwartz makes short films that circulate primarily in an experimental and non-fiction film context.   Films are generally constructed from fragmented collections and findings, from both exterior and interior spaces. His films have exhibited in many festivals including New York Film Festival “Views from the Avant-Garde” and “Projections”, TIFF “Wavelengths”, Rotterdam, Ann Arbor, Images, Media City, Recontres Internationales, Exis, TIE, and others. Recent solo screenings include UnionDocs, Cinema Project, and San Francisco Cinematheque.   In 2010,  he was included in The Film Society of Lincoln Center’s Avant-Garde Poll in Film Comment as one of 25 Filmmakers for the 21st century. He holds an MFA from Massachusetts College of Art, lives in Brattleboro, Vermont and is an associate professor at Keene State College.

Jo Dery (Brattleboro, VT): Jo Dery is an artist who experiments with visual storytelling. She makes short films, little books, prints, and installation projects. Her short films have screened at the Ann Arbor Film Festival, the International Film Festival Rotterdam, and the Eyeworks Festival of Experimental Animation. In 2012, she received the Helen Hill Award, which supports innovative independent filmmakers. She has been awarded grants from the LEF Foundation, The Free History Project, and the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts. Her drawings and prints have been exhibited in Providence, New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, and Berlin. Her little books can be found in independent stores like Ada Books (Providence), Quimby’s (Chicago), and Little Otsu (Portland).

She earned a BFA in Film/Animation/Video from the Rhode Island School of Design and an MFA in Interdisciplinary Arts from Goddard College. She has completed residencies at the MacDowell Colony and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, as well as participated in an animation workshop at the Academy of Fine Arts in Krakow, Poland.

After living in Providence for a decade, she relocated to Chicago to teach in DePaul University’s Animation program for three years. She is currently based in Brattleboro, Vermont, and is an Assistant Professor of Film Studies at Keene State College in southern New Hampshire.

Warren Cockerham (Bennington, VT): Warren Cockerham is a film and video maker who received his MFA in Film, Video, and New Media from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2010 and earned a BA in English from the University of Florida’s Film and Media Studies program in 2006. From 2008-2012, his interests in media democracy and advocacy led to the founding of FilmLAB@1512: a film and video art-making program for teenagers in Chicago’s North Lawndale Community. He’s worked as a programmer and curator for The Florida Experimental Film Festival, RISK Cinema at the Harn Museum of Art, The Chicago Underground Film Festival, and The Eye and Ear Clinic At SAIC. His film and video work is motivated by a curiosity about complex power structures in familial/intimate relationships and how these analogue power structures are presented and observed through the mediation of public and private archival material. His short films and videos have screened at a variety of moving-image venues domestically and abroad.  He is currently Visual Arts Faculty at Bennington College where he runs a bi-weekly invitational screening and lecture series.

Colin Brant (Bennington, VT): Colin Brant is a moving-image maker and technician who, for the last 2 years, has been working primarily with hand-processed 16mm film. His growing body of short 16mm works explore visual rhymes that grow out of repetitive camera performances, and deal with landscape, movement, and exploration. His choice to work with image sequences in a handmade/homemade/tactile way are a means to these ends. He is currently the Film/Video/Animation technician at Bennington College in Vermont.

Stay tuned for our Spring 2015 programming!

After a flurry of programs in Spring 2014, Headroom went on a break to regroup. Joining the programming team are Mike Gibisser and Jason Livingston with possible guest programmers on deck.

We’re finalizing our programming for Spring 2015 and look forward to continuing to present and support experimental and expanded cinema in Iowa City.

glisten_Web

Some hints about Spring 2015…

– A tribute program to Harun Farocki in February

– Traveling showcase of films from New England including work by Jodie Mack, Robert Todd, and many, many more! 16mm and Super 8 films!

– Kelly Sears in person! All the way from Boulder, CO

– Proud to support IC DOCS in April 9-11, a student-run and programmed festival supporting expanded nonfiction

Stay Tuned!

– Jesse

 

TV’s Playhouse – curated by Alison Wielgus, Anna Swanson and Metrah Pashaee

laurie+clone
The artists of TV’s Playhouse capitalized on the funds flowing into television in the 1970s and 1980s to create experimental, joyful, critical, and self-reflexive videos about our love of television. They invite spectators to imagine a world where television is a playground – a space to ask questions about art in a shifting media landscape. Join us for a look into television’s strange and surprising past!
 
Curated by Alison Wielgus, Anna Swanson, and Metrah Pashaee
 
Videos:
Alive From Off Center Excerpts, 1987-9, Laurie Anderson and Clone
Suite 212, 1975, Nam June Paik et al.
Adventures of the Avant-Garde, 1981, Jaime Davidovich
As Seen on TV, 1988, Charles Atlas in collaboration with Bill Irwin
Facing a Family, 1971, VALIE EXPORT
 
Total Running Time approximately 80 minutes
 
Where:
101 Becker Communication Studies Building
25 South Madison Street
Iowa City, IA
 
When:
Saturday, May 3, 2014 – 8:00pm
 
Free Admission

Heroines of Handcrafted Cinema – programmed by Kelly Gallagher

altitudezero

Headroom is proud to present a program curated by Kelly Gallagher, a graduate student in the Department of Cinematic Arts. Kelly will present “The Heroines of Handcrafted Cinema”, a program of handmade films, all crafted by women exploring and implementing tactile and tangible forms of cinema-making. Filmmaker and artist Charlotte Taylor, who received her MFA from the Department of Cinema and Comparative Literature at UIowa, will be in attendance.

WHERE:
101 Becker Communication Studies Building
25 South Madison Street
Iowa City, IA

WHEN: Saturday, April 12, 2014  –  8:00pm

FREE ADMISSION

BodyBesieged

The heroines of “handcrafted” cinema animate moving images that are literally created by their own hands — images that are crafted, painted, torn up, spit up, chewed out, glittered up, collaged, drawn, painted, puppeteered, sewn, hand-processed, bleached, scratched, made with love, made with hate, and made with everything in between. Utilizing handcrafted cinema, these filmmakers make labor visible and invite spectators to become producers by making their filmmaking processes, tools, and materials viscerally transparent. Come join us for an evening of handmade cinematic fun! (KG)
Films:
Peeks – Jo Dery
The Body Besieged – Kelly Sears
Quick and Easy – Lauren Gregory
Unsubscribe #1: Special Offer Inside – Jodie Mack
Ceallaigh at Kilmainham – Kelly Gallagher
L’eye – Xander Marro
Night Hunter – Stacey Steers
Arbor – Janie Geiser
Myth Labs – Martha colburn
Like a Lantern – Lille Carré
Altitude Zero – Lauren Cook 
The Edge of Summer- Charlotte Taylor
edgeofsummer

 

Two events with visiting artist Brett Kashmere March 14 + 15

Headroom Screening Series is pleased to present two events with visiting artist Brett Kashmere in person!

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BRETT KASHMERE is a Canadian-born, Pittsburgh-based filmmaker, curator, and writer. Combining traditional research methods with materialist aesthetics and hybrid interfaces, Kashmere’s experimental documentaries explore the intersection of history and (counter-) memory, popular culture, geographies of identity, and the politics of representation. His 2006 video essay, VALERY’S ANKLE, which examined the spectacle of hockey violence in North American media, has screened internationally at festivals, microcinemas, cinematheques, and galleries, and was named one of the top ten “Underseen, Underdiscussed” films of the decade in CINEMA SCOPE magazine. Kashmere’s current project, FROM DEEP continues his foray into the skein of sports, identity, and nationality. www.brettkashmere.com

In addition, Kashmere is the editor and publisher of INCITE – Journal of Experimental Media and on Friday March 14, Kashmere will give a talk relating microcinema history and the current issue “Exhibition Guide”, which pays homage to American microcinemas. He will also screen a selection of videos. From the introduction to “Exhibition Guide”, INCITE #4:

While vertically mapping MICROCINEMAS of past and present, this issue also surveys the breadth of alternative media exhibition practice, from Dziga Vertov’s agit-train and Bill Brand’s metro MASSTRANSISCOPE, to artists who use film without projectors and projectors without film. In the age of so-called “participatory” media, in which people connect virtually using avatars and aliases to stream data on handheld devices, what binds these social cinematic sites, herein, and makes them flourish?

WHERE: 101 Becker Communication Studies Building, 25 South Madison Street, Iowa City, IA

WHEN: Friday, March 14, 2014  –  8:00pm

SECOND EVENT: On Saturday March 15, at FilmScene, Kashmere will present his video essay FROM DEEP.

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Part video essay, part audiovisual mixtape, FROM DEEP “looks at basketball and its profound role in American life – as an everyday street game played by millions around the country; a force in fashion, music, and mass media; and a platform for broader issues of race and class. Drawing its imagery from contemporary pick-up games, contemporary films, music videos, and spectacular sports footage, Kashmere charts a history of the game over the last century, including its rapid cultural rise in the 1980s, with the global branding of Michael Jordan; basketball’s growing connection with hip hop culture; and its multiplying fan base, which laid the groundwork for the sport’s significance today.” (Amy Beste, Conversations at the Edge)

WHERE: FilmScene is a community-supported cinema located at 118 E. College Street, On the Ped Mall, Downtown Iowa City

WHEN: Saturday, March 15, 2014  –  7:00pm.

There will a brief Q&A following the screening. Both events are FREE to the public.