Catching Z’s at the End of Language – 105 AJB, Friday, December 07 at 7pm – FREE!

Join us for Catching Z’s at The End of Language, a program of films curated by Jason Livingston.

Amos Vogel, legendary short film programmer and founder of the influential Cinema 16, has written “What we know of the world comes to us primarily through vision. Our eyes, however, are sensitive only to that segment of the spectrum located between red and violet; the remaining 95 percent of all existing light (cosmic, infrared, ultraviolet, gammas, and x-rays) we cannot see. This means that we only perceive 5 percent of the “real” world.”

This program of shorts asks us to see, if we dare, beyond the 5% of our habitual viewing habits to a political landscape over and beyond the frames that so dominate our vision.

Catching Z’s at The End of Language traverses geography and history, interior states and external realities, perception and politics, and the expressive possibilities of language despite the power structures that manifest themselves through oppressive grammar.


PROGRAM:

SUPREMATIST KAPITAL
Yin-Ju Chen and James T. Hong
video, 5:21, 2006

A Symbolic History of Kapital. Inspired by Kasimir Malevich’s minimalist artworks and the struggles for resources in the age of peak oil, Suprematist Kapital was born of the want to create a visual artwork that could be displayed on many different-sized mediums regardless of resolution, e.g., theater screens, mobile devices, ipod’s, etc.
Where once technology as progress was an end in itself, it became the handmaiden of capitalist accumulation and war, and is now a form of capital itself in the age of peak oil.

7.24.14
Jason Livingston
16mm/video, 4:15, silent, 2014

Demonstration in support of Gaza and against Operation Protective Edge on July 24, 2014 in Ithaca, NY. A child of the protestors, a white newborn, ghosts into the film flare, and the second half of the film focuses on the young Palestinians killed during the Operation.

Limited Speech Holds Endless Misunderstandings
Orr Menirom
video, 10:00, 2013

A news interview with Noam Chomsky on the Israeli television turns into a surreal dream, revealing the subconscious of both Chomsky and the interviewer.

In 2010, Noam Chomsky was invited to give a talk in Birzeit University near Ramallah. Identified with the radical left, he was denied entry to Israel and sent back to Jordan. Shortly after the incident, Dana Weiss from the Israeli Channel 2 met with him at a hotel lobby in Amman for a 40 minute interview. During the interview, deep ideological tensions between Chomsky and Weiss surfaced. In the video, the interview language is cut apart into individual words, and then recomposed into a new monolog told by an invisible, third character. The character’s speech reference’s Chomsky’s linguistic theory.

According to Chomsky’s theory of Universal Grammar, language enables the pronunciation of endless expressions with a limited amount of words— a vocabulary. Similar to verbal language, the video’s image is a system with an inner grammar, portraying the deserted landscape through a complex of digital fragments. In this landscape, the relations between a limited amount of fragments create endless variations of the image. At the end of the video, the fragment arrangement mimics the shape of the hotel lobby in which the news interview took place.

TATUM’S GHOST
Stephanie Barber
video, 3:07, 2011

A super condensed re-edit of an Unsolved Mysteries episode where cut-aways become the stars and real and imagined Youtube comments mingle together and compete with the original content. The comments on Youtube are my favorite part of that video viewing experience. I love the way they flop so gracefully between cruel and shallow, deep and kind. Strange and wandering they construct dialogs and narratives along an incredibly modular path and expand the viewing of any video making the medium necessarily interactive.

IFO
Kevin Jerome Everson
16mm/video, 10:00, 2017
IFO is about three famous UFO sightings over Mansfield, Ohio.

Farther than the eye can see
Basma Alsharif
video, 12:56, 2012

A woman recounts her story of the mass exodus of Palestinians from Jerusalem. Beginning with the arrival and ending with the departure, the tale moves backwards in time and through various landscapes. The events are neither undone nor is the story untold; instead, Farther than the eye can see traces a decaying experience to a place that no longer exists.

Bethlehem
Peggy Ahwesh
video, 8:28, 2012

Working through my archive of accumulated video footage, I pretended it was found footage from anonymous sources. What began as a tribute to Bruce Conner of the period of Valse Triste and Take the 5:10 to Dreamland, with their deliberate pace and bittersweet memory of home, ended as a dedication to my father as I wound my way through miscellany with distance and another aim.

By foot-candle light
Mary Helena Clark
video, 9:00, 2011

A walk through the proscenium wings. You close your eyes and suddenly it is dark.

Oona’s Veil
Brian Frye
16mm, 8:00, 2000

Whispering Hope, or Grace and How to Get It. I know of only one film-record of Oona Chaplin (nee O’Neill), this screen-test made for a film in which she was cast and never appeared, having met and married Charlie Chaplin before shooting commenced.

ONEIROMANCER
Beatriz Santiago Muñoz
video, 26, 2017

Oneiromancer is the first of a series of works on the sensorial unconscious of the Puerto Rican anti-colonial movement. It centers on the figures, places, and leftover materials of the members of the Fuerzas Armadas de Liberación Nacional, a clandestine group, who were arrested and sentenced to near-lifetime prison terms for seditious conspiracy, a political crime.

 

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HEADROOM is sponsored by the Department of Cinematic Arts, the Public Digital Arts Cluster, and Little Village Magazine.

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all UI-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Cinematic Arts at 335-0330 or cinematicarts@uiowa.edu

Margaret Rorison – 105 AJB, Tuesday, October 09 at 7pm – FREE!

Join us for the season’s kickoff Headroom event with Baltimore-based filmmaker and curator, Margaret Rorison, in town to present a program of short films on 16mm and video!

Rorison’s works often develop from explorations through rural and urban landscapes, combining language, sound and imagery to create installations, films and live 16mm projections. Her recent films explore the visceral nature of memory and its dialogue between space and experience. She is interested in the potentials of storytelling through the use of 16mm projection and sound, often collaborating with sound artists, exploring ways in which the image and machine can converse.

Rorison won a 2018 Baker Artist Award for Film, she is a recipient of a 2016 Rubys Artist Project Grants, a recipient of The Maryland State Arts Council 2016 Individual Artist Awards and 2015 Sondheim Semi-finalist. She was awarded a 2015 Grit Fund Grant in addition to a 2012 and 2014 Launch Artists in Baltimore Grant to start a new experimental film series, Sight Unseen which has been running since 2012.

Her work has been exhibited at Anthology Film Archives, Ann Arbor Film Festival, Edinburgh International Film Festival, Images Festival, Miami PULSE Art Fair, Mono No Aware VI & VII, Microscope Gallery, The Moscow Museum of Modern Art and The National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C.

PROGRAM
Clicks Inside My Dreams
Short Films by Margaret Rorison

PULL/DRIFT
2013 | 16mm to video | 9m | sound
This film documents a unique choreographed performance that took place one late summer afternoon in Patapsco State Park in Baltimore, Maryland. Choreographed by Clarissa Stowell Gregory and performed by The Effervescent Collective. Soundtrack composed by Josh Millrod.

Dark Logic
2015 | 16mm to video | 5m | sound
An ode to the restricted space and surveillance in the skies. Sound derived from a live performance by Mario de Vega Shot in Los Angeles, Summer 2015

Funes el memorioso
2015 | 8mm to 16mm to video | 2m | sound
The final footage of a painter, slowed down to lengthen the memory. Sound by Audrey Chen (voice and cello) & Flandrew Fleisenberg (percussion)

Chorus
2017 | 16mm to video | 2m | silent
a cadence of history between one long pause

Gedanken aus der Luft
2017 | 16mm to video | 6m| sound
Studies of Lichtenberg and The Klingenberg Power Plant, in what is formerly known as East Berlin. Soundtrack by Joke Lanz

The Birds of Chernobyl
2012 | 16mm | 7m | sound
This piece was originally made as a performance with a live collage soundtrack. This is an ode to my grandfather, Harry Bennett and our shared interest in solitude and landscape.

vindmøller
2014 | 16mm | 3 min | sound
This short film is a study of the wind turbines along the shores of Amager, Copenhagen. Triple exposed on one roll of color film, then finding four generations of grain. The soundtrack is a recorded live improvisation by artist Mario de Vega using unstable media and acoustic resonators.

SCANSION
2012 | 16mm to video | 8m | sound
SCANSION is a short 16mm film composed of extensive walks through various Baltimore landscapes. The film has been hand edited like a poem, where cuts function like line breaks, working to establish inherent rhythm and meter.

DER SPAZIERGANG
2013 | 16mm to video | 3m | sound
This film documents long walks throughout Berlin, Germany during the cold days of April 2013. The film is edited in camera and composed of single frame snapshots along with longer moments of glance, captured on one 100’ roll of film. The title comes from a story by Robert Walser.

One Document for Hope
2015 | 16mm | 8m | sound
The sterile and procedural narrative of the Baltimore City Police Scanner on Monday April 27 against precious moments of gathering, celebration and protest in Baltimore from April 28 – May 3, 2015.

Memory of August
2016 | 16mm | 5m | sound
A series of moments captured in room 139. Intimate spaces of time spent with my grandmother, Margaret during a month long recovery in a rehabilitation center in Baltimore, Maryland.

Departure
2018| 16mm | 6m | sound
A double loop projection incorporating handmade cyanotypes and sound.

TRT: 63 minutes

To keep up to date, follow us on Facebook
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HEADROOM is sponsored by the Department of Cinematic Arts, the Public Digital Arts Cluster, and Little Village Magazine.

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all UI-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Cinematic Arts at 335-0330 or cinematicarts@uiowa.edu

Erin Espelie – 105 AJB, Wednesday, May 09 at 8pm – FREE

Part poetry, part chemistry lesson, part landscape film, part cinematic exploration, part history and geography lesson, part environmental revelation, part magic. The Lanthanide Series is something new under the sun.
–Scott MacDonald

A gorgeous, informative feature-length tone poem about the rare earth elements. Equal parts Farocki and Chambers.
–Michael Sicinski

Join us for the season’s final event, with visiting filmmaker Erin Espelie in person to present a recent feature and short!

ERIN ESPELIE is a writer, editor, and filmmaker, with degrees in molecular and cellular biology from Cornell University and the experimental and documentary arts from Duke University. Her poetic, nonfiction films have shown around the world at the New York Film Festival, the British Film Institute’s London Film Festival, the Whitechapel Gallery, the International Film Festival Rotterdam, the Copenhagen International Documentary Film Festival, the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, Imagine Science Film Festival, and more.

Her feature-length documentary, The Lanthanide Series, won the grand prize at the Seoul International New Media Festival in 2015; it has shown in Denmark, Portugal, the U.K. and had its New York City premiere at Anthology Film Archives in June 2016.

Espelie currently holds an assistant professorship in Film Studies and Critical Media Practices at the University of Colorado Boulder; she serves as an Associate Director of the Center for Environmental Journalism and is Editor in Chief of Natural History magazine, a centenarian publication for which she has worked since 2001.

PROGRAM:

The Sea Seeks Its Own Level
2013, 5 minutes, Color, Sound, Super 8 film mastered to HD digital videoA distillation of references to the sea in James Joyce’s Ulysses, and a tangible look at the material effects of an aging Super8-mm camera.

They are coming, waves, white-maned seahorses, wind brindled.
Drowning they say is the pleasantest. Salt green death, spiked and winding cold seahorn, music everywhere. No, that’s noise . . . The earth convulses in all its glory.

 

The Lanthanide Series
2014, 70 minutes, Color, Sound, HD digital video & 16mm film mastered to DCPFrom the portals of personal computing devices to ancient obsidian mirrors, optical instruments control how people see, foresee, frame, record, and remember their lives. The Lanthanide Series meditates on how we understand the world through such material means, with a reliance on history, the Periodic Table, and the people we love.

https://www.erinespelie.com
https://www.facebook.com/HeadroomIC

NOW! Journal of Urgent Praxis, 105 AJB, Friday, April 13 at 7pm – FREE

Headroom is thrilled to host a presentation of NOW!, originally curated by Kelly Sears and screened at Collective Misnomer in Denver, CO

Residing at a crossroads between film journal and radical newsreel, Now! A Journal of Urgent Praxis foregrounds films and writings made in rapid yet eloquent engagement with the here and now of political and cultural life. In the age of YouTube, the radical newsreel awaits a spectacular, transformative re-birth. Now! is digital flint and steel.  It is important to note that urgency has nothing to do with “newness.” There are urgent documents that have existed for hundreds of years or more. Urgency is defined by Now! in the simplest possible manner. Now! foregrounds work, new or old, that has an urgent value for the present moment. Work that needs to be seen, read, and confronted Now!

Work presented at this screening at Headroom, made in the past three years, urgently responds to the murders of Michael Brown, Freddie Gray, Alton Sterling, Philando Castile, “Grab them by the Pussy”, election discourse, the Standing Rock Sioux resistance, the white supremacist march on the University of Virginia campus, and peaceful protest of the anthem through taking the knee.  This screening also functions a series of radical GIFS made in response to social and political actions, exploring a new form of rapid response and circulation.

http://www.now-journal.com/
https://www.facebook.com/HeadroomIC/

PROGRAM:

For Michael Brown, Travis Wilkerson, 4:30, 2014

Out of respect for his parents’ request, four and one half minutes of silence for Michael Brown Jr. One minute for each hour his body lay in the streets of Ferguson, MO after he was shot to death by Officer Darren Wilson. Please watch in darkness. Please watch in silence.

Now! Again!, Alex Johnston, 4:37, 2014

NOW! AGAIN! is a reenactment of a classic radical film, “Now” by Santiago Alvarez, staged this summer in Ferguson, Missouri by the cops themselves. Playing themselves, the cops reenact their own vicious history as if they were checking their performance in a mirror shattered by gunfire. NOW! AGAIN! blows up at the intersection of an avant-garde film act and an urgent manifesto for militant action, demanding an end to police violence NOW!”

One Document for Hope, Margaret Rorison, 7:15, 2015

Margaret Rorison’s One Document for Hope, pits the sterile and procedural narratives of a Baltimore City Police Scanner against images from the collective moments of gathering, celebration, mourning and protest in response to the 2015 death by police of 25 year-old Freddie Gray. The juxtaposition of these elements, institutional dispassion versus community action, makes legible the power of the latter to confront and resist the former.

Baton Rouge to Jackson ’63, Dan Albright, 1:41, 2016

A historical juxtaposition of police terror in the aftermath of Alton Sterling’s murder in Baton Rouge July 10th, 2016 and during the Civil Rights Movement in Jackson, MS June 13, 1963.Baton Rouge to Jackson ’63 is an exceptional illustration of a growing sub-genre of urgent political cinema: the radical re-enactment of historical violence, echoing one another with a jarringly precise confluence.

Repeat: Justice for Alton Sterling, Kelly Sears, 1:24, 2016

The murder of Alton Sterling was followed by another devastating press conference, where Quinyetta McMillon, the mother of Alton Sterling’s oldest son, speaks about the trauma of having their children learn about their father’s death through repeated video replays, news sound bites, and social media circulation of the killing of Alton Sterling. This quote featured in this short work comes from this press conference.

July 8th, 2016, Jason Halprin, 3:30 2016

Alton Sterling. Philando Castile. 5 police officers in Dallas. The Civil Rights Movement isn’t a part of history. It is a fight that is happening now. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY & HUMAN DIGNITY. Which side are you on?

Forty Years, Irene Lusztig, 12:15, 2016

For the past two years, Irene Lusztig has been filming people (mostly women and mostly strangers) reading letters sent to the editor of Ms. Magazine––the first mainstream feminist magazine in the US–in the 1970s, in the cities where the letters were originally written. In this short film, four women read letters about sexual violence that were sent to Ms. Magazine between 1974-76.   This is happening now, but it has also been happening forever. This project was edited and released right after the presidential debate, where Hilary Clinton was interrupted and stalked on stage, which occurred right after the pussy grabbing offense and millions of women sharing their experiences of sexual assault on Twitter.

Quiet Time, Ryan Harper Gray, 2:32, 2016

Quiet Time intervenes in the reactionary rhetoric from the Presidential debates.  Employing the strategy of erasure, the militarist, imperialist, and misogynist discourse is rejected, removed, and thrown out. The silence that remains still carries the trace of the eliminated declarations.  The absence of speech is a false respite as the focus is shifted toward the formation of the next distorted refusal and rebuttal.

Land of the Free, Vanessa Renwick, 3:01, 2016

Up above the land, in the clouds, borderless, a meditation on the legacies of colonialism and borders. Made in support of the Standing Rock Sioux resistance.

The Forcing (No. 7), Lydia Moyer, 2:21, 2017

A powerful tribute to the students who stood their ground against the “many sides” of white supremacy in Charlottesville.  One in a series of works responding to current political and social events in the US.

The Forcing (No. 8), Lydia Moyer, 4:53, 2017

Meditations on modes of resistance through taking the knee and peaceful protest. One in a series of works responding to current political and social events in the US.

Nazlı Dinçel at 105 AJB, Friday, March 30 at 7pm – FREE

Don’t miss visiting filmmaker Nazlı Dinçel, who will be in attendance to present a program of her new and recent work!

Nazlı Dinçel’s hand-made work reflects on experiences of disruption. She records the body in context with arousal, immigration, dislocation and desire with the film object: its texture, color and the tractable emulsion of the 16mm material. Her use of text as image, language and sound imitates the failure of memory and her own displacement within a western society.

Born in Ankara, Turkey, Dinçel immigrated to the United Sates at the age of 17. Dinçel resides in Milwaukee, WI where she is currently building an artist run film laboratory. She obtained her MFA in filmmaking from UW-Milwaukee. Her works have been exhibited in numerous venues around the world including Tiger Shorts competition at IFFR, New York Film Festival, Edinburgh International Film Festival and Dallas Contemporary.
She recently won the Marian McMahon Akimbo award at the 2017 Images Festival with Untitled (2016) and was also awarded Best Experimental Film at the 2015 Chicago Underground Film Festival with Her Silent Seaming (2014).

http://www.nazlidincel.com/
https://www.facebook.com/HeadroomIC/

PROGRAM:
NOTE TO SELF: FILMS OF NAZLI DİNÇEL
An evening of visceral and provocative handmade films that explore bodies, acts of the solitary, text, language, visual information and personal exposure. Nazlı Dinçel’s work reflects on experiences of disruption. She records the body in context with arousal, immigration, dislocation and desire in juxtaposition with the medium’s material: texture, color and the passing of emulsion. Her use of text as image, language and sound attempts the failure of memory and her own displacement within a western society.
Total Run time: 62min

Leafless
16mm, 8min, Color, Silent, 24fps, 2011
Leafless is an expansion of collections, a hand processed love poem of textures about becoming familiar with a significant other’s body in reservation with its landscape.

Her Silent Seaming
16mm, 10min, Color, Super 16 Image-Sound, 24fps, 2014
A transcription of what I have been told during intimate experiences while separating from my husband. Sections consist of destroyed originals from Leafless (2011) and motifs of the “feminine”. These decorative objects are re-valued through a controlled act of cutting, with an allusion to synchronization. Direct sound of cuts and hand processing are composed of 26 frame shots. Un-synced, it reveals a hearing of past images, as an act of translation.

Sharing Orgasm: Communicating Your Sexual Responses (Educational Found Film)
16mm, 12 min, Color, optical sound, 24fps, 1977

Solitary Acts #4
16mm, 8min, Color, Optical Sound, 24fps, 2015 Exacto Knife, Typewriter
The filmmaker films herself masturbate the object of debate. She hears others claim her body, her habits: those in her conservative surroundings as a child. She learns how to read.

Solitary Acts #5
16mm, 5min, Color, Sound, 24fps, 2015 Exacto Knife, Fishing Line, Sewing Machine
The filmmaker films herself practice kissing with a mirror. She recalls teenage memories of overconsumption, confusing oral fixations that are both sexual (kissing) and bodily (eating). She ends up eating the carrot she is masturbating with, and feels a sense of cannibalism.

Solitary Acts #6
16mm, 11min, Color, Optical Sound, 24fps, 2015 Exacto Knife, 1.5mm Letter Punches, Hammer, Leather Puncher
The filmmaker films her subject in a private act, complicating what could be considered a solitary act. This is a feminist critique of the Oedipal complex, narrating from the perspective of the female. The filmmaker recounts an abortion she had in 2009. The aborted child takes the place of her lover.

VOID (4.INABILITY)
16mm, 4min, Color, Silent, 18fps, 2016
This is a re-destroyed film that I was unable to finish in 2013. Filmed both in ruins: at the Sutro Baths in San Francisco and in final domestic spaces occupied with a former partner. Film was destroyed in ocean water.

Shape of a Surface
16mm, 9min, Color, Optical Sound, 24fps,Turkey, 2017
The ground holds accounts of once pagan, then christian and now muslim ruins of the city built for Aphrodite. As she takes revenge on Narcissus, mirrors reveal what is seen and surfaces, limbs dismantle and marble turns flesh.

Between Relating and Use
16mm, color, 9min, sound, 24fps (Argentina/USA) 2018 Laser engraver, Ektachrome
Borrowing words from Laura Mark’s “Transnational Object” and DW Winnicott’s “Transitional Object”, this film is an attempt to ethically make work in a foreign land. Transitioning from assuming the position of an ethnographer, we turn and explore inwards-
on how we use our lovers.

Betzy Bromberg at 105 AJB, Thursday, March 8 at 7pm – FREE

“Images that, once seen, will stay with you forever.”
— Holly Willis, LA Weekly

Join us for the season’s second event, with legendary filmmaker, Betzy Bromberg in attendance to present her new feature, Glide of Transparency, on 16mm!

Betzy Bromberg, Director of the Program in Film and Video at California Institute of the Arts, has been making experimental films since 1976. Her most recent film, Glide of Transparency (2016/17), premiered at the Redcat Theater in Los Angeles. Glide of Transparency is the third film in her 16mm abstract trilogy.  It was listed as one of the year’s best films in both Senses of Cinema (Jordan Cronk) http://sensesofcinema.com/2017/world-poll/world-poll-2016-part-2/ and Fandor (Michael Sicinski and Jordan Cronk) https://www.fandor.com/posts/interesting-times-year-avant-garde-film.  Her previous film, Voluptuous Sleep (2011), also had its first screening at Redcat and had its festival premiere at the New York Film Festival: Views From The Avant-Garde.  Voluptuous Sleep was listed as one of the Best Films for 2011 in both the New York Times (Manohla Dargis) and Indiewire (Andrea Picard).  Scott MacDonald included it in his Highlights 2012 in Lumiere Magazine (www.elumiere.net) and has published an interview with Ms. Bromberg in his recent book, Avant-Doc: Intersections of Documentary and Avant-Garde Cinema.

PROGRAM:

Glide of Transparency
Betzy Bromberg, (2016/17, 16mm, color, sound, 89 min)

Following A Darkness Swallowed (2005) and Voluptuous Sleep (2011), Betzy Bromberg’s third experimental feature, Glide of Transparency, goes further into translucent abstraction while conveying the intimate feeling of being transported to a sublimated inner garden. Glide of Transparency unfolds in three movements, each layered with its own intricate sound design (field recordings from the avian and insect world, ambient audio, vocals, and a composition for acoustic instruments). The non-narrative progression traverses luscious curves, vibrant colors, luminous contours and the scintillating trajectory of light over matter, over filmic texture.

“I am interested in making films that explore intimate places of the interior.  For me, the combination of visual and aural abstraction is sublime, a means of forging pathways without a path, journeys devoid of compass bearings, invoking mysterious and unearthly transports.  I am interested in making work that has no points of reference, where scale replaces structure and time is experienced rather than counted.

Glide of Transparency is a film in three movements, an exploration of color and light.  Ultimately, it is a film about love and transcendence.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Headroom Spring 2018 lineup w/ Shana Moulton, Betzy Bromberg, and Nazli Dinçel

We’re thrilled to announce the Spring 2018 lineup for Headroom with three incredible visitors and an exciting collaboration with our friends at Vertical Cinema! Stay tuned for more info about each…

Friday, Feb 09 at 7pm, co-presented with Vertical Cinema:
SHANA MOULTON, screening and performance
at the Drewelowe Gallery, 1st floor of the Visual Arts Building, 

Shana Moulton creates evocatively oblique narratives in her video and performance works. Combining an unsettling, wry humor with a low-tech, Pop sensibility, Moulton plays a character whose interactions with the everyday world are both mundane and surreal, in a domestic sphere just slightly askew. As her protagonist navigates the enigmatic and possibly magical properties of her home decor, Moulton initiates relationships with objects and consumer products that are at once banal and uncanny. Her video work has been screened and exhibited internationally, including at Art in General, New York; Migros Museum, Zurich; Contemporary Museum of Art, Uppsala; Rencontres internationales, Paris; Aurora, Edinburgh; Internationale Kurzfilmtage, Oberhausen; and Gimpel Fils, London. She has recently performed An Evening with Shana Moulton at MoMA in NYC, the Hammer Museum in LA, and Kunsthaus Glarus in Switzerland. She is the recipient of a Creative Capital Grant and has been featured in Art 21, Artforum, Frieze Magazine, Art in America, and many others.
http://www.shanamoulton.info/

 

Thursday, March 08, at 7pm
BETZY BROMBERG
at the Franklin Miller Screening Room, 105 Adler Journalism Building

Following A Darkness Swallowed (2005) and Voluptuous Sleep (2011), Betzy Bromberg’s third experimental feature, Glide of Transparency, goes further into translucent abstraction while conveying the intimate feeling of being transported to a sublimated inner garden. Glide of Transparency unfolds in three movements, each layered with its own artful sound design (field recordings of birds and insects, ambient audio, vocals, and a composition for acoustic instruments). The non-narrative progression, Bromberg says, is “a journey devoid of compass bearings, forging pathways without a path.” Luscious curves, vibrant colors, and the scintillating trajectory of light over matter, over filmic texture, echo fragmented memories of paintings we have loved, and, embracing love, bring us to transcendence.

 

Friday, March 30 at 7pm
NAZLI DINÇEL
at the Franklin Miller Screening Room, 105 Adler Journalism Building

Nazlı Dinçel’s hand-made work reflects on experiences of disruption. She records the body in context with arousal, immigration, dislocation and desire with the film object: its texture, color and the tractable emulsion of the 16mm material. Her use of text as image, language and sound imitates the failure of memory and her own displacement within a western society.

Born in Ankara, Turkey, Dinçel immigrated to the United Sates at the age of 17. Dinçel resides in Milwaukee, WI where she is currently building an artist run film laboratory. She obtained her MFA in filmmaking from UW-Milwaukee. Her works have been exhibited in numerous venues around the world including Tiger Shorts competition at IFFR, New York Film Festival, Edinburgh International Film Festival and Dallas Contemporary.
She recently won the Marian McMahon Akimbo award at the 2017 Images Festival with Untitled (2016) and was also awarded Best Experimental Film at the 2015 Chicago Underground Film Festival with Her Silent Seaming (2014).
http://www.nazlidincel.com/

 

Canyon Cinema 50 Tour – 105 AJB, Friday & Saturday, Dec 1 & 2 at 7pm – FREE

Headroom is thrilled to present two programs—TWO!—on successive nights as part of Canyon Cinema’s 50th anniversary screening tour, commemorating half a century of distributing and preserving rare, experimental 16mm work in its original medium.

On Friday night, we’ll be screening a program called DARK SHADOWS, presented by guest-curator, Christopher Harris.

On Saturday, Canyon Cinema 50 Tour curator, David Dinnell, will present STUDIES IN NATURAL MAGIC, which offers lessons in place, materiality, and the relationship between.

Canyon Cinema is a nonprofit film and media arts organization that serves as one of the world’s preeminent sources for artist-made moving image work. 2017 marks its 50th anniversary. The organization celebrates this milestone through the Canyon Cinema 50 project, which includes a screening series in the San Francisco Bay Area, US and international touring programs showcasing newly created prints and digital copies, and an educational website including new essays, ephemera, and interviews with filmmakers and other witnesses to Canyon’s 50-year history.

The Canyon Cinema 50 tour was curated by David Dinnell, visiting faculty at California Institute of the Arts and former Program Director at the Ann Arbor Film Festival, the film tour draws exclusively from Canyon’s vast collection. As one of North America’s oldest experimental film distributors, Canyon preserves and distributes over 3,400 moving image works across the country and the world, representing a diverse cross-section of avant-garde currents and movements that date from 1921 to the present day.

canyoncinema.com
facebook.com/canyoncinema
twitter.com/canyoncinema
facebook.com/HeadroomIC/

See below for much more info about both programs. As always, Headroom is free and open to the public!

PROGRAMs:

Dark Shadows (FRIDAY)
Woman stabbed to Death, Stephanie Barber (1996, 16mm, 8.5min)
Back in the Saddle Again, Scott Stark (1997, 16mm, 10min)
Black and White Trypps #4, Ben Russell (2008, 16mm, 10.5min)
B/Side, Abigail Child (1996, 16mm, 38min)

Studies in Natural Magic (SATURDAY)
Catfilm for Katy and Cynnie, Standish Lawder (1973, 16mm, 3min)
Light Lick (Amen), Saul Levine (2017, 16mm, 4min)
Ciao Bella or Fuck Me Dead, Betzy Bromberg (1978, 16mm, 9min)
Swish, Jean Sousa (1982, 16mm, 3min)
28.IV.81 (Bedouin Spark), Christopher Harris (2009, 16mm, 3min)
Redshift, Emily Richardson (2001, 16mm, 4min)
A Study in Natural Magic, Charlotte Pryce (2013, 16mm, 3min)
Starlight, Robert Fulton (1970, 16mm, 5min)
Hand Held Day, Gary Beydler (1975, 16mm, 6min)
Portland, Greta Snider (1996, 16mm, 12min)
Degrees of Limitation, Scott Stark (1982, 16mm, 3min)
Shrimp Boat Log, David Gatten (2010, 16mm, 3min)
Boston Fire, Peter Hutton (1979, 16mm, 8min)
Orchard, Julie Murray (2004, 16mm, 10min)

DARK SHADOWS features four films that, each in their own mysterious ways, plumb the depths of the collective optical unconscious: Stephanie Barber’s repetition compulsion, Scott Stark’s return of the repressed, Ben Russell’s stroboscopic Rorschach test and Abigail Child’s daydream nation.

STUDIES IN NATURAL MAGIC features recent films by Saul Levine, Charlotte Pryce, and Christopher Harris; rarely screened films by Standish Lawder and Jean Sousa; sublimely filmed and acutely perceived portraits of cities, seas, skies, and landscapes by Peter Hutton, Julie Murray, Gary Beydler, Robert Fulton, and Emily Richardson; Betzy Bromberg’s audacious and energetic feminist punk city symphony; Degrees of Limitation, one of Scott Stark’s earliest films, a humorous 3-minute structuralist gem; and Portland, a mid-90s travelogue and playful Rashomon-like inquiry into the nature of truth by Greta Snider.

 

FILMs:

in Dark Shadows

Woman stabbed to Death, Stephanie Barber
WOMAN STABBED TO DEATH is a short film concerned with both the apathy of human receptivity and the perverse nature of free floating paranoia so artfully engrained in women. it is a tiny horror film, with the soundtrack skipping blithely over the literal graves of millions and the metaphorical grave of one’s feelings of safety.

Back in the Saddle Again, Scott Stark
A family’s playful interaction with a 16mm sound movie camera, singing along as a group with Gene Autrey’s title song in front of the camera, combines western fantasy, American kitsch, gender posturing, deterioration of the film’s surface, the wonderment of the cinematic process, and the use of controlled accidents to shape the form of the film. My only intrusion on the footage was to print it first in negative, which adds a bleak, mysterious edge to it, and to print it again in positive, which seems to answer many of the questions raised in the first part.

Black and White Trypps #4, Ben Russell
“Jesus Christ, look at the white people, rushing back. White people don’t care, Jack…”
– Richard Pryor

B/Side, Abigail Child
Child’s B/SIDE is a provocative exploration of the urban homeless, combining sensitive footage of their exterior situation and entering imaginatively into interior fantasies. Framed by footage of the encampment locally known as Dinkinsville on New York’s Lower East Side, where some of the homeless of Tompkins Square Park settled after the riots of June 1991, the movie begins with the encampment’s first night and ends with the fire and subsequent destruction of the lot in October of the same year. Applying rhythmic construction, poetic license and a generous eye to bodies in poverty, B/SIDE documents a gritty vision of late 20th century urban life.

 

in Studies in Natural Magic

Catfilm for Katy and Cynnie, Standish Lawder
In the early 70’s, a New York cat-lover and film-maker named Pola Chapelle produced a “Cat Film Fesitval:” which was shown in a large downtown NYC auditorium to an audience of more than a thousand cat-lovers. At the time, I lived with my wife Ursula and our daughters Katy and Cynnie, together with many, too many cats. I loved my family but not the cats. –SL

Light Lick (Amen), Saul Levine

Ciao Bella or Fuck Me Dead, Betzy Bromberg
“[Ciao Bella] shows a world of crowded, kinetic New York streets and hauntingly empty interior spaces, graced briefly by wisps of childish energy and the provocation of nearly naked women. Bromberg deftly contrasts that vibrant exuberance with a sense of devastating loss and the effect is at once brazenly personal (if elliptical) and incredibly powerful. Unfolding desire merges with the ever-present reality of the threat of losing what you love.” . – Holly Willis, LA Weekly

Swish, Jean Sousa
This film deals with the physical properties of the film medium, and pushing those distinctive features to their limit. The subject of the film is motion, and it is an attempt to get inside of it. It was made with a moving subject and a moving camera with an open shutter, the result being that each frame is unique, without the smooth continuity that is expected in film. The subject, a female body at close range, provides an intimacy and eroticism. At the same time it can be seen as a modern version of Futurist simultaneity.

28.IV.81 (Bedouin Spark), Christopher Harris
“…display[s] a concern with textures of light as well as the capacity of the human imagination to will celestial entities out of the relatively impoverished materials at hand. (Call them The Potted Plant of Life.) 28.IV.81 (Bedouin Spark) (2009) is a lovely miniature edited in-camera, in which Harris manipulates light around a child’s mobile so that a hanging nightlight with plastic silver stars becomes a glinting ersatz sky.” -Michael Sicinski, Cinema Scope Magazine

Redshift, Emily Richardson
In astronmoical terminology redshift is a term used in calculating the distance of stars from the earth, hence determining their age. redshift attempts to show the huge geometry of the night sky and give an altered perspective of the landscape, using long exposures, fixed camera positions, long shots and timelapse animation techniques to reveal aspects of the night that are invisible to the naked eye. The film has a gentle intensity to it, and is composed of changes of light across the sea, sky and mountains. It shows movement where there is apparent stillness, whether in the formation of weather patterns, movement of stars, the illumination of a building by passing car headlights or boats darting back and forth across the sea’s horizon.

The sound has been composed for the film by Benedict Drew, taking field recordings of the aurora borealis as a starting point, and using purely computer generated sound to create a soundtrack that reflects the unheard elements present in the earth’s atmosphere.

A Study in Natural Magic, Charlotte Pryce
Witness an alchemist’s spell: the transmutation of light into substance: a glimpse of gold.

Starlight, Robert Fulton
A Tibetan Lama. His disciple. The disciple’s wife, young boy and terrier. An old tugboat crossing the Mississippi River. A man in his seventh month of solitude. His hermitage built by his own hands. The man’s bloodhound; his cat. Clouds crossing the Continental Divide. A mountain stream. A girl. The sun.

Hand Held Day, Gary Beydler
“Beydler’s magical Hand Held Day is his most unabashedly beautiful film, but it’s no less complex than his other works. The filming approach is simple, yet incredibly rich with possibilities, as Beydler collapses the time and space of a full day in the Arizona desert via time-lapse photography and a carefully hand-held mirror reflecting the view behind his camera.

“Over the course of two Kodachrome camera rolls, we simultaneously witness eastward and westward views of the surrounding landscape as the skies, shadows, colors, and light change dramatically. Beydler’s hand, holding the mirror carefully in front of the camera, quivers and vibrates, suggesting the relatively miniscule scale of humanity in the face of a monumental landscape and its dramatic transformations. Yet the use of the mirror also projects an idealized human desire to frame and understand what we see around us, without destroying or changing any of its inherent fascination and beauty.” (Mark Toscano)

Portland, Greta Snider
The film is a documentary road movie about travel, the fallibility of photographs, and the merging of memory and imagination.

Three friends, including the filmmaker, rendez-vous in Portland by hitchhiking or train-hopping from different cities. After a week of arguments, soup kitchens, brushes with the law, and bad weather, each leaves with a different memory of the trip, refracted through the tensions and expectations of their triangulated friendship. PORTLAND reconstitutes the trip in a humorous mixture of footage from the journey (taken with a run-down Super 8 camera), interpreted re-enactments, and interviews with the involved parties. The result is a spirited look at independent women and fearless travelers.

Degrees of Limitation, Scott Stark
A single 100′ roll shot with a hand-wound 16mm Bolex. For each shot the camera was wound one additional time, allowing me to make it a little bit farther up the hill. Will I reach the top before the film runs out? A study in self-imposed limitations.

Shrimp Boat Log, David Gatten

Boston Fire, Peter Hutton
“BOSTON FIRE finds grandeur in smoke rising eloquently from a city blaze. Billowing puffs of darkness blend with fountains of water streaming in from offscreen to orchestrate a play of primal elements. The beautiful texture of the smoke coupled with the isolation from the source of the fire erases the destructive impact of the event. The camera, lost in the immense dark clouds, produces images for meditation removed from the causes or consequences of the scene. The tiny firemen, seen as distant silhouettes, gaze in awe, helpless before nature’s power.” -Millennium Film Journal

Orchard, Julie Murray
Much of the footage that comprises Orchard is of a 19c ruins that included a walled orchard in and area known as Rostellen in southwest Ireland. It is set deep in the woods and the crumbling brick and mortar of the broken walls has become the anchor for the roots of slender trees, so uninhibited for all this time that they reach twenty feet in height and have thick roots that follow like slow lazy trickles of water and in other places branch and wind over the brickwork in an apparently intelligent arterial arrangement reminiscent of the human body. Some footage of Central Park is in there, as well as Niagara Falls, the main Dublin-to-Cork road and a thin smoking woods on the outskirts of Rosslare, Co. Waterford

These are facts may be incidental to the film’s eventual form, which winds the images into an arrangement of continuous wandering. All this is attended by environmental whispering sounds until a voice calls out toward the end, in dream-bound recognition, to a figure from the far, far past. – JM

 

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all UI-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Cinematic Arts at 335-0330 or cinematicarts@uiowa.edu

HEADROOM is sponsored by the Department of Cinematic Arts, the Arts and Humanities Initiative, the Public Digital Arts Cluster, and Little Village Magazine.

 

Mike Stoltz at 105 AJB, Tuesday, Nov 14 at 7pm – FREE!

UTA_STILL5

Join us for the season’s second Headroom event, with filmmaker Mike Stoltz in attendance to present a program of new and recent work on 16mm and video!

Mike Stoltz is a filmmaker whose work uses the tools of cinema to explore time, mythology, memory, and the medium itself. Both intimate and quizzical, his films reposition the familiar and nearby until office park architecture turns stroboscopic, kitsch relics are overcome with moss and mold, nature overtakes the man-made, and history folds in on itself. Stoltz has screened his work at numerous festivals including the Ann Arbor Film Festival, the New York Film Festival – Projections, the European Media Art Festival, Le Festival des Cinémas Différents et Expérimentaux, and the Toronto International Film Festival – Wavelengths, among many others.

UTAannaJON_1

PROGRAM:

Toward The Concrete – Films by Mike Stoltz
Ten Notes on a Summer’s Day (2012, HD, 4:30)
In Between (2010, 16mm, 4:30)
Under The Atmosphere (2014, 16mm, 15:00)
With Pluses and Minuses (2013, 16mm, 5:00)
Half Human, Half Vapor (2015, 16mm, 12:00)
Spotlight On A Brick Wall (2016, 16mm, 8:00)

Ten Notes on a Summer’s Day (2012, HD, 4:30)
“…The camera in Ten Notes on a Summer’s Day fixes on a young woman standing against a painted blue wall, the sun partially lighting her face, the sound of distant traffic in the background. Offscreen, a guitarist plucks single notes, and the woman hums along. When the music falls outside of her vocal range, she switches to a lower octave, her mouth turned up in a small grin. Later, she frowns slightly, seemingly unable to find her note. Gradually her confidence builds and her smile returns, though her humming is no longer anywhere close to the guitar’s pitch. Ten Notes is a marvel; it’s as unhurried and refreshing as this woman’s singing, which, though off-key, produces an unexpected harmony, a little song discovered in the process of its own making.”
-Genevieve Yue, Reverse Shot, Issue 33

In Between (2010, 16mm, 4:30)
“An exercise in permeable architecture, an attempt to walk through a wall.” -MS

Under The Atmosphere (2014, 16mm, 14:30)
“Filmed on the Central Florida “Space Coast”, site of NASA’s launch pads. Dormant spacecraft, arcane text, activated landscape, and the surface of the image work towards a future-past shot reverse shot.” -MS

With Pluses and Minuses (2013, 16mm, 5:00)
“…Stoltz shakes and dislocates audio and image with volume and pitch variations, editing the 16mm film in camera, varying the focus and the shot length of every frame, shifting background and foreground, turning and spinning the camera hand-held positions, and allowing sequences of black that punctuate the image’s algorithms. The filmmaker’s dance transforms abstraction into personal experience. He is an active agent of the surrounding world, and of the opportunities that open and close before us.”
-Mónica Savirón, LUMIÈRE Fall 2013

Half Human, Half Vapor (2015, 16mm, 11:00)
This project began out of a fascination with a giant sculpture of a dragon attached to a Central Florida mansion. The property had recently been left to rot, held in lien by a bank. Hurricanes washed away the sculpture.

I learned about the artist who created this landmark, Lewis Vandercar (1913-1988), who began as a painter. His practice grew along with his notoriety for spell-casting and telepathy.

Inspired by Vandercar’s interest in parallel possibility, I combined these images with text from local newspaper articles in a haunted-house film that both engages with and looks beyond the material world.

Spotlight On A Brick Wall collaboration with Alee Peoples (2016, 16mm, 8:00)
A performance film that navigates expectations of both the audience and the makers. A series of false starts. Dub treatment on the laugh track.” -AP&MS

http://mikestoltz.org/

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Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all UI-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation in order to participate in this program, please contact Cinematic Arts at 335-0330 or cinematicarts@uiowa.edu

HEADROOM is sponsored by the Department of Cinematic Arts, the Arts and Humanities Initiative, the Public Digital Arts Cluster, and Little Village Magazine.

Headroom Fall 2017, or: An Embarrassment of Riches

We’re thrilled to announce the Fall 2017 lineup for HEADROOM!  Check back for details on each of the five (FIVE!) exciting programs listed below:

Thursday, Oct 12 at 8pm, Adam Khalil w/
INAATE/SE [it shines a certain way. to a certain place./it flies. falls./]
RAD Inc.

INAATESE 3History is written by the victors, but this film reminds us 
that the history of the oppressed can still be saved from being extinguished. Native American video artists Adam and Zack Khalil here reclaim the narrative of the Ojibway of Sault Ste. Marie, in Michigan’s Upper Penninsula, from the archives and museums that would confine it to the past. Using personal interviews, animated drawings, performance, and provocative intercutting, the Khalil brothers’ feature debut makes a bold case for the Ojibway people to be their own storytellers—while seeking a cure for the damage inflicted by colonization—in a spiritual reconnection with tradition. –MoMA, Documentary Fortnight 2016 Catalogue
http://www.inaatese.com/

 

Wednesday, Nov 8, Melika Bass
time and place TBD

SHED_Bass_still_1-copyMelika Bass makes slow-burning, abstracted narrative films and immersive installations. Her international screenings and exhibitions include: BFI London Film Festival, Torino Film Festival, CPHDox Film Festival, Ann Arbor Film Festival, the Film Society of Lincoln Center, and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, amongst others. She was one of a dozen international filmmakers commissioned by Icelandic band Sigur Ros to create an original film for their Valtari Mystery Film Experiment. She is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Film, Video, New Media, and Animation at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.
http://www.tenderarchive.com/

 

Tuesday, Nov 14 at 7pm, Mike Stoltz
105 Adler Journalism Building

stoltz_03 Mike Stoltz uses the tools of cinema (moving images, sound, special effects, projection, and montage) to explore time, mythology, memory, and the medium itself. His work at screened at TIFF’s Wavelengths, the International Film Festival Rotterdam, the New York Film Festival – Projections, Edinburgh International Film Festival, the Echo Park Film Center, amongst many others. Stoltz will be presenting a program of his work on 16mm and video that reposition the familiar and nearby in a way that is both intimate and quizzical.
http://mikestoltz.org/
Friday/Saturday, Dec 1 & 2 at 7pm, Canyon Cinema 50 Film Tour Double Header
105 Adler Journalism Building

Bromberg_Ciao_Bella-1For their 50th anniversary, Canyon Cinema has put together an international tour of their 16mm catalogue, with many recent restorations and new prints. We’re happy to host back-to-back nights of programming, one from guest-curator Christopher Harris, and the second, Canyon Cinema 50: Studies in Natural Magic, presented by tour curator, David Dinnell. As a component of the Canyon Cinema 50 project, the touring program is meant not only to celebrate Canyon’s history but also to point the way towards the organization’s continued relevance as both a purveyor of and advocate for artist-made cinema, seeding the next generation of what founding filmmaker Bruce Baillie described as “a federation of willing devotees of the magic lantern muse.”
http://canyoncinema50.org/