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History Corps at the University of Iowa

History Corps is a graduate student-led, online digital and oral history project based out of the Department of History at the University of Iowa. Through friendly, open, and reciprocal collaborations with community partners, nonprofit organizations, and graduate and undergraduate classes in the UI and Iowa City communities and beyond, we tell stories and lend our academic training to interpretive projects that prove how history and the humanities affect everyone’s everyday lives.

We have two primary goals: First, we aim to make the relevance of History and humanities education more apparent to the citizens of Iowa and the Midwest. Second, we provide academic training and real-world experience to humanities graduate students interested in research and careers that straddle the academic and non-nonacademic worlds.

History Corps is a tool that students can use to gain professional skills as digital and public historians. We follow a “Scholars First” teaching model, meaning our primary objective is to teach students how to become successful professional scholars, chiefly trained in rigorous academic research, writing, teaching, and interpretation. These skills are supplemented—not replaced—by the administrative and digital, oral, and public history skills accrued while working with History Corps.

We are always looking for projects to examine, partnerships to develop, and stories to tell. Whether you’re a teacher interested in adding an oral or digital history component to your class or a community member engaged in a history project (or hoping to start one!), History Corps can help you get your project off the ground. Over the past several semesters, we’ve developed a strong network of collaborators who can help you create, manage, and display content online. We welcome rigorous scholarship and interpretation from professionals and community members alike. 

History Corps is about making your history come to life.

Header image by Stewart Butterfield (flickr) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons